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guests for dinner and breakfast too?

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guests for dinner and breakfast too?

I live in a quiet neighborhood that has very few inexpensive restaurants and none of them are "fast food" type. If cyclists arrive near dinner time it is usually no problem to include them in my meal (unless they are vegans or vegetarians) but I'm wondering what to say if they arrive later in the evening. I have a spare kitchen for their use but some don't carry food with them. Breakfast is fine unless they are getting up before dawn as I am retired and sleeping until daybreak is my one luxury. Is it OK to just say NO?

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Host house, host rules

As the host you set the conditions for your guests. Hosts are under no obligations whatsoever to provide anything for anyone.

That said, most people host because they WANT to have guests and WANT to provide at least a place to get out of the weather. That desire is the first, common, thing we hosts share. After that, well, it's up to each of us to set our limits and live by them.

It's up to our guests to accept our limits as hosts and agree to them. When they do, all is well; when they don't . . ..

The great thing about being a host is being able to go beyond my stated limits. If my guest is agreeable and we get along well I will do more than I state in my profile. If my guest is NOT agreeable, I do what I say I will do and show them the door when it's time to go.

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Just Tell them

Just make this information part of your profile and include it in your exchanges with potential guests. Too easy: "There are no inexpensive or fast food restaurants near my home. If you arrive in time for dinner, and we have agreed ahead of time, I am happy to share our meal with you. Should you arrive later it would be best if you've already eaten or picked up the makings of dinner - you are welcome to use our kitchen. Please be prepared to feed yourself breakfast."

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feeding guests

Part of the reason I host is that I enjoy fixing a real meal for anyone, including myself. Living alone it is hard to get myself motivated to fix a balanced meal. Having a guest is a reason to set a nice table, fix a meal with side dishes. In the profile it is stated that enjoy doing this and ask if there are any dietary restrictions. I have found that a greater percentage of riders are vegetarians than my normal circle of friends. i am happy to fix a meal around them. As for vegans, one young bicyclist told me " you do not have to worry about them showing up at your door , none of them would have the energy to pedal here"
As for breakfast, I am out the door before they leave most of the time, I tell them to help themselves
to whatever they find. All have cleaned up whatever mess they made before they left and have not wiped out any food stocks that could not be replaced for a few bucks. If it on the weekend i enjoy making up french toast or pancakes for each of us.
Bottom line, open communication from both parties is what works. State on your profile what you are planning to or can provide. And prompt them for any info you need about arrival time. I fixed a stir fry meal
last week for a young woman who had a rough day and did not get here until after 10 pm at night.
Not my normal dinner time, but so what need to be flexible in life.

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Vegans

We live at the top of a fairly large hill in really hilly country. Most of our Warm Showers guests comment on the difficult terrain. I would say, Kevin, that your young friend's advice about vegans was a bit off. We've had vegans stay with us and they seem to handle the terrain as well as any other riders we've hosted.

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Cyclists without Food ....??

I find it amazing that cyclists ( particularly) would travel without at least *some* food - enough for an "emergency" anyway. Amazing - but clearly true in some cases

When I am a Guest, I will always bring some food ( eg a good loaf of bread, or some beer...) and I will always offer to cook for the Host if they want, and definitely offer to wash dishes...

I have to say, many of my Guests do none of these things ....

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This is about the same for

This is about the same for me.
The best part about hosting, is the sense of giving someone out on an adventure a safe harbor.
We always have breakfast together if I am home (vacations or weekend), dinner the same if they want to (sometimes guests will be out to check out the city and that is fine, we usually communicate these things during a stay.

That said, more then once our guests extend the stay with a day extra (or two actually), they sort of become part of the family for the time and I still keep in contact with them afterwards.

Oh and yeah, I never take money for anything, as a big family, the extra amount for a few guests equals to nothing for us, but for the guests it might be a huge thing.

I'm already looking forward to spring/early summer when the guests start showing up again!

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Feeding guest cyclists

Since I asked the question almost two years ago I have hosted many cyclists and the answer seems to be "remain flexible". Breakfast is usually an easy meal as bacon and eggs is uncommon at my place. I usually offer my special pancakes or toast and cereal as an alternate. Assuming my guest arrives before nightfall I will include them in my dinner plans. Or they can cook their own. Most cyclists offer to clean up afterward which is always appreciated. Treating them as family has been my approach. Like others I have enjoyed hosting these weary travelers and feel good that I have been a small part of their journey. In giving we receive.