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Which tires shall I choose for my restored miyata 210?

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Which tires shall I choose for my restored miyata 210?

Hi everyone!

I restored this 1985 miyata 210. It looks very sexy and rides awesome. It was kept in a garage by some collector for most of its life and pretty much had like new original parts. I replaced all drive-train components, and replaced or fixed a ton of miscellaneous other parts and screws and what have you. Heres the issue. It had the ORIGINAL miyata tires on it. They are 27x 1 1/8. The rims say 27 x 1 1/4 which gives me a little more wiggle room. I rode it 50 miles in a day and have been doing 10-25 a day on it with the old school tires. But ya know, they're fricken 30 years old, and I'd like to replace them before I take this thing on a 600 mile tour.

In my research, the available tires for this size that seem decent are the Continental Gatorskins, which I used on my old bike (with 26 x 1 wheels.. when will I get a regular size?), and Continental Tour Ride tires.

Because I love gatorskins, despite the fact that they are pain in the arse to take on and off for me, I would just get those. But my trip is going to be from Cleveland OH to Albany NY, and a huge 365 mile chunk of that is along the Erie Canalway trail. A lot of that is gravely and stone dust, but some is paved. I could avoid the canalway and take ny bike route 5 which goes along highway 31, all paved. But c'mon, its fun to ride along the canal! So, the Conti Tour Ride tires have tread. The gatorskins dont. The gators are maybe a little higher quality though. Whats a girl to do?

Any advice? Any other tire ideas besides what I listed? And yes, I considered replacing the wheels, but what a pain in the butt/wallet.

Thanks!

WS Member Imagen de WS Member
tires for your restored miyata 210?

Great bike, I would not worry about the tread, the fact that lots of your ride will be on pavement the last thing I would want is tread. Extra vibration over hundreds of miles, yuk.
I used to live next to a canal path in NJ, rode it all the time with, in fact gator skins, no tread, never had a problem, it too was gravel and stone dust.
Now I will tell you a story, I biked cross country many years ago on a Miyata Grand Touring, Miyatas are great bikes well thought out and nice ride. Last year I went to a yard sale, and there was a very dusty bike for $25, it had a long back derailor which I had broke on my current touring bike so I bought it, Didn't really look at it. The woman said she bought it new, never rode it much. When I got home and washed it off, it was an 85 Miyata 210. 94 miles on the counter still all org with a little nobbies still on the tires. Its a great bike I decided not to use for parts.
Have a great ride,, enjoy you new old wheels, If you are in RI stop by and say hello

WS Member Imagen de WS Member
gratitude

Thanks so much for your advice and story!

I love this thing, and it helps me feel less nutty knowing other people have taken these things a long way.

WS Member Imagen de WS Member
Gators are great!

I have Conti Gatorskins on my '75 Motobecane Grand Touring - 27 X 1 1/4. They're great for every day riding and light touring. I wouldn't try the Dempster with them, but for packed trails and pavement, they're a very solid tire. I rode the Erie Canal on a trip from Oberlin to Ct in 2013 with my son. We found much of the canal trail to be hard going even on 35mm Marathons. Fortunately, Rt 31, or NY bike route 5 runs pretty much parallel to the canal and is a very good ride. Just pop over to the trail for the boater/biker campgrounds.

There are many journals of people on crazyguyonabike who have ridden the Erie canal, but this is mine:
http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/Oberlin2013

Jim